Takaoka City Receives National Recognition as “Historical City”

Originally written for the Vol.5-No.6 edition (August 2, 2011) of the Toyama Hot News e-newsletter.

The Takaoka City Historical Preservation Plan has earned recognition from the Japanese government as a Historical City under the Historical Town Creation Act (Rekishi Machizukuri-hou). It is the first in Toyama Prefecture, and second in the Hokuriku Region. (The first was Kanazawa City, Ishikawa Prefecture, in January 2009.) There are now a total of 26 cities and towns with this “Historical City” designation. Combined with the opening of the Hokuriku Shinkansen (bullet train) scheduled for 2014, an increase in tourism is anticipated.

The Historical Town Creation Act, signed in November 2008, gives recognition to the historical preservation plans of the cities, towns, and villages, and supports projects that nurture local history and traditional culture.

Takaoka City, located in the northwest of Toyama Prefecture, is the prefecture’s second-largest city after Toyama City. During the Nara Period (710-794), Takaoka became the capital of Etchu Province, and the famous Man’yoshu poet Otomo no Yakamochi was once the governor. In 1609, Maeda Toshinaga, the second head of the Kaga Domain, built Takaoka Castle and developed the surrounding area. Soon after, Maeda Toshitsune further stimulated the area’s industry. Combined with the efforts of the townspeople, Takaoka grew to be a commercially successful city.

In present-day Takaoka, folk arts such as Takaoka copperware and lacquer ware have been passed down, and festivals such as the Takaoka Mikurumayama Festival and the Fushiki Hikiyama Festival continue to be celebrated. In addition, Takaoka retains historical architecture such as the National Treasure temple of Zuiryu-ji, and in the traditional Yamamachi-suji and Kanaya-machi districts.

With the financial support of the national government, Takaoka will be working on a total of 28 projects over the next ten years to preserve and improve the city’s historical legacy. The wide variety of projects include: maintenance repair work on Zuiryu-ji roofs, reconstruction of the observation tower at the Fushiki Weather Station Museum, building a road from the new shinkansen (bullet train) station (2014 expected completion) to Zuiryu-ji, construction of a Mikurumayama (festival float) Museum, and a survey of historical landmarks related to the Maeda clan.

Takaoka City hopes that residents will have more love and pride for the history of their hometown, and create a city that can better communicate to visitors about its history, traditions, and culture.

Source (article and photo): Toyama Just Now

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