mont-bell Tateyama Alpine Hill Climb 2013

Tateyama Alpine Hill Climb

Originally written for the Vol.7-No.1 edition (April 4, 2013) of the Toyama Hot News e-newsletter.

On Sunday, June 23, cyclists will be able to race toward the clouds along the Tateyama Kurobe Alpine Route in the mont-bell Tateyama Alpine Hill Climb 2013. This event is organized by an executive committee composed of members from Toyama Prefecture, Tateyama Town, and the Toyama Cycling Federation.

The Tateyama Kurobe Alpine Route is usually closed to personal vehicles for nature protection purposes, and this is the first time a cycling event open to the public will be held there. One of the aims is to create further promotional appeal for the Alpine Route as a sports tourism destination.

There are two options for the Tateyama Alpine Hill Climb: a “long course” and a “nature ride course.” The “long course” traverses 22.3 km (13.9 mi.), and begins at Bijodaira Station (977m/ 3,200 ft. elevation) and finishes at Murodo (2,450m/ 8,040 ft. elevation). The route climbs 1,473 m (4,833 ft.) at an average 6.6% incline, offering a challenging ride for advanced cyclists. The “nature ride course” is 7.6 km (4.7 mi.) and climbs 520 m (1,706 ft.) at an average 6.8% incline from Midagahara (1,930m/6,332 ft. elevation) to Murodo, and is geared toward less experienced cycling enthusiasts and mountain aficionados.

On the “long course,” participants will be able to see the dramatic change in scenery from Tateyama cedar and beech forests to small alpine plants. The “nature ride course” begins with magnificent views of Midagahara and Dainichidaira, which are recognized as important wetlands by the Ramsar Convention. A unique feature of the Tateyama Alpine Hill Climb is that unlike most hill climb events in Japan that simply go through forests, this event offers sweeping mountain views. In addition, participants may even see snow toward the end of their rides; along Yuki-no-Otani on the approach to Murodo, walls of snow 6 to 7 meters (20 to 23 ft.) usually still remain around this time of year.

Start time for the “long course” is 5:30 a.m., and 6:00 a.m. for the “nature ride course.” The event is scheduled to end at 8:00 a.m., and regular buses between Bijodaira and Murodo will be suspended for the duration of the event. The participant limit is 100 people per course. “Long course” registrants need to present a record of a previous cycling event.

The entry fees are 50,000 yen for the “long course” and 55,000 yen for the “nature ride course,” and include one night accommodation, two meals, and bicycle transportation back, and bus transportation.

Official event website: http://www.tateyama-inc.jp/hillclimb/

Source (article and image): Toyama Just Now

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Sheridan Japanese School Visits Toyama

Sheridan Japanese School students meet with Takaoka Minami High School students at Great Buddha of Takaoka
Sheridan Japanese School students meet with Takaoka Minami High School students at Great Buddha of Takaoka

Originally written for the Vol.7-No.1 edition (April 4, 2013) of the Toyama Hot News e-newsletter.

On March 14, 21 students (8th-11th grade), 2 parents, and 3 teachers from Sheridan Japanese School spent a day in Toyama as part of a longer trip around Japan. At Sheridan Japanese School, a charter school located in Yamhill County, Oregon, all students study Japanese language and culture. However, this was the first trip of its kind for the school.

The eager group arrived from Osaka by train in the evening of March 13. The next morning, Japanese Program Director Andrew Scott and two students met with Toshiyuki Hiyoshi, Director-General of the Tourism and Region Promotion Bureau. They discussed active sister state activities, including the teacher exchange program that has Ms. Akiko Nakano from Toyama currently teaching at Sheridan Japanese School. No one in the group had been to Toyama before, and the students also expressed their excitement at seeing tourism sights and of course, eating hard tofu. (Gokayama tofu is known for its extra firmness.)

Looking down at Ainokura Village, Gokayama

After this only “official business” of the day, the entire group was off to Ainokura, one of the villages of Gokayama, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. While the snow was long gone down in the city, it still very much felt like winter in Gokayama. Since the valleys in western Oregon do not see a lot of snow, the students were delighted to see everything covered in white. Between learning from the volunteer guide about the history of this settlement hundreds of years old, with their buildings designed to withstand heavy snow, teenagers (and teachers!?) could also be seen throwing snowballs and sliding down snow-covered hills. This is certainly a side of Japan that many Western visitors never see.

Hiking down a snowy hill

Then, it was time to go to Gokayama Washi-no-Sato to experience traditional Japanese papermaking. At first they seemed a little confused at the idea of “making paper,” but everyone seemed to be having a fun time choosing decorative pieces for their handmade postcards and soaking their hands in the pulp! Hopefully, the students have a new appreciation for the process of making washi (traditional Japanese paper). While we unfortunately did not have a lot of time and had to move quickly through our activities of the day, it seemed that many students would have liked to spend more time in the gift store at Washi-no-Sato, which sells just about anything you could possibly want that is made out of washi, from stationary and home décor to business card holders and coasters!

We enjoyed lunch at the adjacent restaurant Furusato, with menu options that included soba, udon, fish, beef bowl, and tofu.

After lunch, we headed to Takaoka City to get a guided tour of Zuiryu-ji, a 350-year-old temple and a designated National Treasure of Japan. For many students, this was their first time at a Japanese temple, and they earnestly took in the historical wooden buildings with their detailed workmanship.

Next was a big highlight for the students: at the Takaoka Daibutsu (Great Buddha), some students from Takaoka Minami High School were eagerly waiting for their American friends. Takaoka Minami is the former school of Ms. Nakano currently teaching at Sheridan Japanese School, and the students had exchanged letters and handmade guidebooks. They had not expected to actually be able to meet in person, and they were thrilled to be conversing in both English and Japanese, each side trying out their second language skills.

We hope that all of our guests had a memorable time in Toyama, and enjoyed experiencing the varied landscapes and culture of Japan. We wish the students the best in their Japanese studies!

Seeking Participants: 2013 Toyama Cup Japanese Speech Contest

Originally written for the Vol.7-No.1 edition (April 4, 2013) of the Toyama Hot News e-newsletter.

Are you a current college student in Oregon studying Japanese or know someone who is? There is still time to enter this year’s Toyama Cup Japanese Speech Contest! The application deadline is Friday, April 12.

Contest Date & Time: Sunday, April 21, 2013, 1:00 – 5:00 p.m.

Location: Two World Trade Center, Mezzanine Level, 121 SW Salmon Street, Portland

Eligibility: Any non-Japanese undergraduate student studying Japanese at a college (community colleges included) or university in the State of Oregon or southwest Washington.

Grand Prize: A trip to Toyama, Japan! Read about the 2012 winner’s visit.

Speech Length: 4 to 6 minutes

Levels:
Level 1 – Any student who has studied Japanese at a college or university for less than 2 years and who has not lived or studied in Japan for more than 3 months in the last three years. (First year and second year language students)
Level 2 – Any student who has studied Japanese at a college or university for more than two years and/or who has lived or studied in Japan for more than 3 months in the last three years. (Third year and above)

Evaluation Criteria: Overall Japanese language ability, grammatical ability, speech content, presentation, and question & answer responses

For more information or to obtain an application form, please contact:
Dixie McKeel (dmckeel[at]jaso.org) or Erik Harebo (eharebo[at]jaso.org)
Japan-America Society of Oregon (JASO)
(503) 552-8811
http://www.jaso.org/